schedule

Monday 5
  1. 1. It took 60 years to look this good! The development of Cognitive Translation & Interpreting Studies [Muñoz]
  2. 2. Our translating minds. What cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics have in store for CTIS [Whyatt]
  3. 3. Cognitive Linguistics. The basics [Halverson]
  4. 4. Studying brain and language. An introduction to the neuroscience of language [Hervais-Adelman]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Tuesday 6
  1. 1. Through a relatively new and uncharted terrain. Current trends and scopes in Cognitive Translation Studies [Muñoz]
  2. 2. In and out a language of our own. Can bilingual memory models help us understand why directionality matters? [Whyatt]
  3. 3. A tale of two disciplines. Cognitive Linguistics and Translation and Interpreting Studies [Halverson]
  4. 4. Multilingualism and the brain. An introduction to the neural basis of multilingualism [Hervais-Adelman]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Wednesday 7
  1. 1. How did you do that? Translators, interpreters, and expertise[Muñoz]
  2. 2. Translation psychology—the hidden aspects of translation behaviour[Whyatt]
  3. 3. Castles in the mind. Schematic networks and translation[Halverson]
  4. 4. The neural basis of interpreting. Functional imaging investigations [Hervais-Adelman]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Thursday 8
  1. 1. What were you thinking? Multitasking, code-switching and metacognition [Muñoz]
  2. 2. The skill of reading and the reading of translated texts—focus on eye-tracking studies [Whyatt]
  3. 3. Translating by default. Letting translation happen [Halverson]
  4. 4. Expertise, interpreting, and your connectome. The cerebral consequences of expertise in interpreting [Hervais- Adelman]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Friday 9

1&2. 1000 ways of making yourself understood. The notions of meaning and translation [Muñoz & Halverson]

3&4. Brain. Mind. Body. Together and apart. Bringing together neurolinguistics and behavioural research: Points of convergence and divergence [Whyatt & Hervais-Adelman]

Saturday 10

Sightseeing Cartagena

Monday 12
  1. 1. The fundamentals of research methodology. How not to kill your theory with your method [Tiselius]
  2. 2. Emotions are cognitive, not innate [Rojo]
  3. 3. Statistical terminology and descriptive statistics [Mellinger]
  4. 4. Love thy neighbour. Why cognitive explorations of translation technology have to engage with the HCI world [O’Brien]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Tuesday 13
  1. 1. Screen-recording, eye-tracking and key-logging. What they are and how to use them [Tiselius]
  2. 2. Emotions are (NOT) lost in translation. They are more alive than ever [Rojo]
  3. 3. Statistical tests of difference [Mellinger]
  4. 4. Human-machine entanglements. Translation is a human-computer interaction task [O’Brien]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Wednesday 14
  1. 1. TAPs and Retrospection. Tapping into the process—Is it at all possible? [Tiselius]
  2. 2. Interpreters are not as emotionless as they may seem [Rojo]
  3. 3. Statistical tests of relationship [Mellinger]
  4. 4. Don’t worry, be happy! Translation, ergonomics and cognition. What an ergonomics perspective can contribute [O’Brien]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Thursday 15
  1. 1. Questionnaires, interviews and observations. A case for meticulous preparation [Tiselius]
  2. 2. More talk, less emotion in accessible translation. The case of audio description [Rojo]
  3. 3. Reading, reporting, and replication [Mellinger]
  4. 4. Antagonistic dualisms. Human-centered artificial intelligence[O’Brien]
  5. 5. Debriefing and exchange [Marín, Meseguer, Ramos & Sannholm]

Friday 16

1&2. First, do no harm. Ethics of research in the workplace[O’Brien & Mellinger]

3&4. Opening up CTIS research [Rojo & Tiselius]

Farewell dinner