Faculty

Sandra L. Halverson
Currently employed at Agder University, Norway, Dr Halverson's research has centered on questions related to Translation Studies and Cognitive Linguistics, under the overarching concern of integrating insights from both disciplines. She has published both empirical and theoretical/conceptual work and is currently working on hypotheses linking translational choices to specifics of cognitive representation and processing. Other long-term research interests are the epistemology of Translation Studies and research methodology. Dr Halverson served as co-editor of Target for eight years and currently serves on the editorial boards of several TIS journals. She was appointed CETRA Chair Professor for 2018 and has held plenary lectures and other invited talks in numerous universities across Europe and China. Dr Halverson is a member of the  MC2 Lab.
Sandra L. Halverson
Alexis Hervais-Adelman
An assistant professor for neurolinguistics at the University of Zurich, Dr Hervais-Adelman obtained his PhD at the University of Cambridge in 2008, where he also held his first post-doctoral position. He subsequently became a senior research and teaching assistant at the University of Geneva, jointly in the Department of Fundamental Neuroscience and the Department of Interpreting. After two years as a member of the Neurobiology of Language group at the MPI for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, he returned to Switzerland to take his current position at the University of Zurich. Dr Hervais-Adelman’s research examines diverse manifestations of human language. In particular, and focuses on how the cerebral networks underpinning this uniquely human communicative ability intersect with other cognitive systems. His main lines of work include how cognitive control of language intersects with domain general cognitive control, the role of the motor system in speech perception and the impact of literacy on brain structure and function.
Alexis Hervais-Adelman
Álvaro Marín García
An assistant professor at the School of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Valladolid, Spain, Dr Marín's research interests lie in the philosophy of science, cognitive translation & interpreting studies, emic approaches to cognitive research on multilectal mediated communication and translation and interpreting expertise. He has published in several reputed TIS journals, mainly on TIS epistemology and new forms of theory development applying a pluralistic methodology. Dr Marín has also explored translation expertise from a variety of theoretical and empirical angles. Recently, he co-edited with Sandra Halverson the volume Contesting Epistemologies in Cognitive Translation and Interpreting Studies(Routledge 2021). Dr Marín is a member of the MC2 Lab.
Álvaro Marín García
Christopher D. Mellinger
An associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA, where he teaches translation and interpreting at the graduate and undergraduate levels, Dr Mellinger's research focuses on translation and interpreting process research, translation and interpreting technologies, and research methods. He is the managing editor of the journal Translation and Interpreting Studies, co-author of Quantitative Research Methods in Translation and Interpreting Studies, co-editor of Translating Texts: An Introductory Coursebook on Translation and Text Formation, and co-editor of special issues on community interpreting, translation, and technology, legal translation and interpreting as well as translation process research.
Christopher D. Mellinger
Purificación Meseguer Cutillas
An assistant professor in the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Murcia, Dr Meseguer’s main research interests are the impact of emotions and personality factors in translation, and the relationship between translation and censorship. She has written a book (Sobre la traducción de libros al servicio del franquismo, ‘On translating books in the service of Francoism’, Peter Lang, 2015) and published many articles in specialised national and international journals. As a professional translator, Dr Meseguer has translated a wide range of books for publishers such as Tusquets, RBA and Random House, an experience that helps her to bring the professional world into the classroom.
Purificación Meseguer Cutillas
Ricardo Muñoz Martín
An intermitent freelance translator since 1987, ATA certified for English-Spanish in 1991, Dr Muñoz worked at several American and Spanish universities and is currently a Professor of CTIS at the University of Bologna, Italy. As a visiting scholar and guest speaker, he has travelled widely in Europe, North and Latin America and China. His works center on the development of Cognitive Translatology, a cognitive-situated theory of multilectal mediated communication, and on particular topics such as chunking, multitasking, task and code-switching, and cognitive control. Dr Muñoz coordinates the MC2 Lab, an international research hub devoted to the empirical research at the interface of and cognition. He is co-founder of AIETI, co-founder and co-editor of the journal Translation, Cognition & Behavior, and co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Translation & Interpreting. He also co-directs this summer school.
Ricardo Muñoz Martín
Sharon O'Brien
Professor of Translation Studies and currently Associate Dean for Research at Dublin City University, between 1995 and 1999 Dr O'Brien worked as a language technology consultant in the localisation industry. She obtained a PhD in 2006 on Controlled Language and Post-Editing Effort. For over 10 years, she was a funded investigator (Science Foundation Ireland) in the ADAPT research centre, where her focus was on human factors and translation technology. Dr O’Brien was co-ordinator of the H2020 EU-funded project The International Network in Crisis Translation (INTERACT) and was also the Director of the Centre for Translation and Textual Studies (CTTS). Her research to date has focused on the interaction between translators and technology (including Translation Memory and Machine Translation), cognitive aspects of translating, content authoring, localisation, and research methods—including eye tracking and keylogging.
Sharon O'Brien
Marina Ramos Caro
An assistant professor in the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Murcia, Spain, Dr Ramos is particularly interested in the influence of emotions and personality in the process and reception of translation and audio description. She has been awarded several international grants, presented her work at international conferences, and published in journals such as Journal of Pragmatics, Journal of Specialised Translation, MonTi, Onomázein, Perspectives, Translation Spaces and The Translator. As a professional translator, Dr Ramos has mainly worked within the fields of subtitling, dubbing, and transcreation. She is also the founder and director of Latrium, the Laboratory for Inclusive Translation of the University of Murcia, a project aimed at promoting the accessibility of the performing arts in the Region of Murcia by means of live surtitles and AD.  
Marina Ramos Caro
Ana María Rojo López
Professor of Translation at the University of Murcia, Spain, Dr Rojo's research interests focus on the role of emotions, creativity and other individual differences in the translation and interpreting process. She currently coordinates a research project on emotions and translation. Dr Rojo is a member of the MC2 Lab, and she co-directs this summer school.
Ana María Rojo López
Raphael Sannholm
He recently completed his PhD dissertation titled Translation, teamwork, and technology. The use of social and material scaffolds in the translation process at Stockholm University. Dr Sannholm’s research, which uses a cognitive ethnographic approach, focuses on translators’ interactions with social actors and technological artifacts. Theoretically, the research is informed by socio-cognitive perspectives, which emphasise the interactive nature of cognitive processes. Among other things, his PhD research shows how translators not only use situation-specific resources for addressing difficulties and uncertainty in the translation process, but also how situation-specific resources are discursively and interactively modified in order to establish support for action in the present as well as in an anticipated future. Dr Sannholm’s scholarly interests include cooperation, social interaction, and tool use in translation work, the nature and workings of coupled and distributed cognitive systems, cognitive ethnography, and related topics.
Raphael Sannholm
Elisabet Tiselius
An associate professor of Translation studies with a focus on interpreting at Stockholm University, Dr Tiselius is a Swedish state authorized public service interpreter, EU accredited conference interpreter, and an AIIC member. Her research deals with cognitive processes in interpreting and translation, and deliberate practice in interpreting and the characteristics of expertise. Another area of her research deals with children as language brokers for their families. Dr Tiselius is currently working on several research projects, including the Swedish Research council funded project The invisible process - Cognition and working memory of dialogue interpreting and the DEPICT project, funded by the Norwegian Research Council, where she focuses on sign language interpreters use of depiction. Dr Tiselius is the President of the EST and she is also a member of the AIIC research committee and of the MC2 Lab.
Elisabet Tiselius
Bogusława M. Whyatt
Professor of linguistics and head of the Department of Psycholinguistic Studies and of PhD studies at the Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland, where she teaches graduate seminars in translation studies and practical translation courses, Dr Whyatt is also a freelance translator. Her main research interests focus on Cognitive Translation & Interpreting Studies, in general, and on language processing in translation, in particular. She was the principal investigator of the ParaTrans project— focused on the process of decision making in interlingual and intralingual translation (i.e., paraphrasing)— and of the EDIT Project, studying the effects of directionality in the translation process and product, and is currently leading the Read Me Project, which studies reading and reception of mediated (translated) text. All funded by the Polish National Science Centre. Dr Whyatt is a member of the MC2 Lab.
Bogusława M. Whyatt